With a shortage in software developers, low-code and no-code platforms have drawn a lot of interest over the last few years. These platforms, which are very similar to e-commerce CMS platforms, were built to allow the creation of apps with little to no coding knowledge necessary. Low-code and no-code platforms are often mistaken for one another. While they both use the same “building blocks” approach, it’s important to clarify that they are two different things with different purposes.

What exactly is a Low-Code platform?

A low-code platform allows users to build web or mobile apps using a visual application system. This generally implies drag and drop processes (dragging and dropping visual blocks that have been pre-coded to model your app). Low-code, as its name suggests, still requires some development skills. This means it mostly targets professional developers or tech savvy business users with the aim of facilitating and accelerating the process by focusing on coding essential features. 

A low-code platform is a good choice for building more complex apps that have mission-critical feature needs that a no-code platform may be unable to provide while sparing developers the repetitive and time-consuming manual processes they would normally need to write when developing an app the traditional way. 

Some of the available low-code platforms are Mendix, Appian or KiSSFLOW.

What exactly is a No-Code platform?

Like a low-code platform, a no-code platform uses a visual application system that will allow the user to develop an app using drag and drop processes as well as use application functions made available by the platform. With the no-code platform, there is no coding involved. It primarily benefits business users or citizen developers who want to develop their apps without requiring any coding knowledge.

No-code platforms are best suited for basic projects that need to be delivered quickly. They happen to be an amazing tool for in-house apps! Let’s say you work in a marketing department and you would like to collect specific marketing-related data. You did your research and there is no such app available on the market. The no-code platform provides you the opportunity to generate a perfectly tailored solution, making your internal operations a lot easier. And that’s just a single example — imagine what you could do by automating manual tasks (and increasing efficiency)! Bye-bye excel sheets!

A few examples of no-code platforms are Salesforce, Airtable or Appsheet.

The Disadvantages of Low-Code and No-Code Platforms

If there are advantages, unfortunately, there are also disadvantages of using low-code and no-code platforms:

  • Flexibility — you will be limited in the customization of your apps and this can be a challenge when trying to adapt to a constantly evolving digital world. 
  • Security — without any proper supervision from professional developers, security concerns may arise. It is very important to be well informed on the platform used. Make sure to review its privacy policy, its procedures and the way it manages and handles data.

With the numerous advantages they offer, it seems both low-code and no-code platforms have a successful future ahead of them. In a recent report, Gartner predicted that low-code applications will be used for 65% of all application development activity in 2024. This could make many developers cringe! However, it is important to remember that the value of any tool is created by the person using it, meaning these platforms will not take over anytime soon. Still, their influence will be felt across many industries. Hand in hand with artificial intelligence, there is no doubt that low-code and no-code platforms will revolutionize the way we work. In the meantime, they will be a considerable asset for any developers and business users for increasing app agility, efficiency and, hopefully, for fighting against Shadow IT.

Want to learn more? Take a look at the “Low-Code vs. No-Code: What’s the Real Difference” article available at Outsystems.

Do you have experience with low-code or no-code platforms? Which ones do you prefer? What do you think about their influence on application development? Let us know in the comments!

For more articles, feel free to visit our blog!

Due to rapid advances in technology, big data has become a hot topic. Everybody is talking about it. What is it? Is it dangerous? How can it change the way we perceive the world?

What is big data?

A few years ago, our colleagues from the TCLoc master’s program met with Professor Gauthier Vasseur from Stanford University to hear his take on big data and its implications. In general, big data refers to an accumulation of data that is too large and complex for processing by traditional database management tools. It, therefore, requires new systems, technology, and processes in order to organize and use all the individual data points.

Although big data has become a trendy new term, few people have more than a vague understanding of what it really is or what it means. Beyond its basic definition, people also want to know about its effects. Is it dangerous? What is its purpose? How can we analyze and process the huge amounts of data being collected each day? One thing is for sure, though: humans are producing unimaginable quantities of data. 

You may not realize it, but every time you send a tweet on Twitter, check-in at your local pizzeria on Foursquare, or like a review on Amazon, you are producing and providing data to these companies. According to Forbes, we produce 2.5 quintillion bytes of data every single day. Each of these data points can be sorted and stored for future use, or even sold. But why would a company want to buy data?

The impact of big data

What is big data used for?

Some people I talked with recently told me they are afraid of big data. They consider it as some form of  Big Brother from the famous book “Nineteen Eighty-Four” by Georges Orwell. Sure, data brokers (a person or a company whose business is to gather, process, and sell data) do exist, but mostly they do it for marketing purposes. Often, companies that buy data want to use it to find out how to better reach their target audience. Also, in a vast majority of cases, companies use our data in order to change or improve their products and make the user experience more friendly or more efficient.

Big data stimulates economic growth

In today’s market, if there is an investment to make in Silicon Valley, it will surely be in companies that work with big data. Data farming companies have made hundreds of billions of dollars since they first appeared in the early 2000s, and we have barely scratched the surface of the opportunities data provides us with. For instance, self-driving cars will be able to predict where and when traffic jams will form and avoid them entirely. The healthcare industry will be able to monitor each one of our vitals and foresee any medical complications that we might face. In fact, the healthcare industry is one of the domains that can profit the most from big data analytics.

Big data creates job opportunities

Data is useless without analytics and processing. Therefore, we need software that can take care of that for us, like Hadoop. Developing such solutions requires programmers and engineers, which means more job opportunities. This is a positive impact of big data on society. Before big data, nobody referred to themselves as a data officer or a data miner, yet jobs like these exist today and are continuing to grow. Admittedly, the revolution that big data and artificial intelligence bring will mark the end of certain kinds of jobs, but it will also create new ones. For example, are Google’s Pixel Buds going to replace interpreters? Although this may happen to some extent, interpreters could then be hired to work on such projects in order to help design and improve these new technologies. A whole world to create and conceive, isn’t it exciting?

So, ultimately, will the impact of big data be good or bad on society? Only time will tell. It is here, however, and it will certainly play an important role in the years to come. As the world becomes more and more interconnected, we need to embrace technological innovations and jump towards that new future with a bit of faith! If you want to read more on the subject, check out this article on the TCLoc master’s website: Will AI lead to the development of a new form of (universal) language, and therefore, to a new conception of the world? Also, don’t forget to let us know what you think about big data in the comments below! Are its effects positive or negative? How do you think it will affect the future?

A website redesign does not involve the same process as creating a website from scratch. It may seem that fewer steps are required since some of the website’s features are already in place. However, making something new with what already exists—sorting features and content and totally rethinking a content strategy—requires an adapted project management methodology. In this article, we explain the 5 essential steps for a successful website redesign and how you can boost your content strategy along the road.

Why embark on a website redesign journey?

The reasons for a website redesign are varied. It can be a “simple” graphic redesign, a “refreshing” of an old-fashioned interface, the development of new features, or a complete rethinking of a Web strategy as well as a website localization. In any case, a redesign has to be motivated by the company or the organization on which the site depends. More simply, redesigning to look “more attractive” doesn’t do much good. A redesign is an opportunity to improve a website at all levels, both in terms of ergonomics and—as we will develop it today—to improve the quality of its content.

Which project management methodology to use?

Using an agile project management methodology, as with any Web project, is entirely appropriate. However, a redesign has its own needs in terms of project management. Let us guide you through this process!

Analyze your customer or your company

First, if you are redesigning a website for a client, take the time to understand them, their old website, and what motivates them to start a redesign. Is it to update a set of contents? Develop new features? Launch a new product range? Get up to date?

If you are responsible for managing a redesign project for your company, it’s still important to set aside time to fully understand the issues involved in the project, trying to step back as much as possible. Put yourself in the shoes of a user who visits the old website: how do you feel while browsing? Write down anything that would need improvement but also anything that you find positive.

A little bit of benchmarking is also appropriate, especially if the website you are working on is quite old. This will give you an overview of current Web trends in the industry.

Make the statistics speak for themselves

Carefully analyzing the statistics of a website, page by page, can seem tedious, especially when the deadlines for completing a project are tight. However, data such as the number of visits for a given period and which  devices, platforms, or keywords were used to access the website are valuable indicators to identify your audience and understand its habits.

The statistics you can collect will also allow you to see which pages are most visited and which pages do not seem to find their audience, which formats or content styles are more appealing, etc.

Reorganize content (without being lazy)

In accordance with the instructions given by your client or your company for the redesign and based on the statistics you have collected, sort all the content of the old website into 3 categories: to keep, to rework, to throw away. Don’t be lazy by keeping content that seems useless or outdated just because it is immediately available. However, be careful not to throw away quality content too quickly because it is not often visited. Ask yourself first if it suffers from a lack of SEO.

Also, brainstorm outside of pre-existing content to enrich the site if you find that important information is missing. Do not forget to reflect on your international audience too during this process. If you can, do this with collaborators during a dedicated meeting.

Then, redesign the website’s structure and navigation. Do not rely on the old one, and be critical. Just because a structure or a navigation has existed for a long time does not mean that it is necessarily relevant. Once again, it is preferable to do this task in a group to compare different points of view. Remember, a redesign without questioning the very foundations of the website is not relevant. It is not a simple matter of putting everything back into perspective, but of questioning schemes that were put in place at a given time and that may no longer be adapted to your audience today.

Keep a content management table

If you need fresh content for the new website, ask your client or your collaborators within your company for help. Explain as clearly as possible what you need—describe the editorial line and tone, any keywords to use, etc. Create a content management table according to your needs to help you monitor the progress of each writer and set deadlines. This table will become your basis for managing your project.

It is also an excellent tool for projects involving localization. You can indicate the number of words to be translated and the languages in which you have already received the content.

Establish a new work base

Work on the content does not stop once the new website is online. To make a website more lively and attractive to visitors through SEO, it is necessary to update it regularly. Create a schedule for publishing blog posts or news articles before the website is launched and ensure that other articles of this kind will be published after. Make your client or collaborators aware of this point and make them want to participate in the life of the website.

Finally, create a list of “sensitive” content, i.e. those that will require the most attention, such as texts with figures, dates, and information that may change frequently, in order to stay on track with the website update.

Did you find these tips for managing a redesign project helpful? Let us know in the comments, and don’t forget to visit our blog for more articles! 

According to the Web Accessibility Initiative’s website, “Web accessibility means that websites, tools, and technologies are designed and developed so that people with disabilities can use them.” Through this article, you will find some tips and tricks in order to make your interface more accessible! 

Why is Web accessibility important?  

“The power of the Web is in its universality. Access by everyone regardless of disability is an essential aspect.” We owe these words to Tim Berners-Lee, W3C Director and Inventor of the World Wide Web itself. 

Indeed, the Web is an incredible tool which was initially designed to bring people together, regardless of location or language. It allows us to communicate and access a tremendous amount of data and information, and modern societies highly rely on its numerous benefits. With universality at its core, it’s only natural for the Web to become more inclusive of people with disabilities, the elderly, people living in rural areas or in developing countries, and people using small devices (smart watches or smartphones). 

Of course, creating a website implies an understanding of its objectives and goals as well as an analysis of the targeted and expected audience. So it may not be necessary for you to adapt your website for people with every kind of disability. However, you should be aware that 15% of the world’s population suffers from various disabilities, which is why it’s important to make your website more inclusive. You can conduct usability testing in order to determine how people navigate your website and where the navigation difficulties are so that you can correct them later on.

There are still many websites which are not fully accessible, hence why the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) provides comprehensive explanations, standards and guidelines to help developers and organizations produce high-quality interfaces. 

Tips and tricks to make your website more accessible 

Now that you have understood what Web accessibility means, let’s have a look at how to make your website more accessible. In order to have a fully optimized and accessible interface, Web accessibility should be taken into account at the earliest stages of your project. However, these simple steps can be easily put in place at any point in the process.

Make sure your images have alt text tags 

You might have heard of alt text tags, but do you really know what they are for? Since search engines cannot interpret images the same way they interpret text, you can add alternative text to an image to describe what it represents in order to help search engines understand your content better. Therefore, alt tags are a great way to improve a website’s ranking, especially e-commerce websites which present pictures of various products. 

Furthermore, these tags are extremely useful for people with visual impairments using screen readers because the device reads the tags, thus allowing the user to understand what the image is about. Images play an important role in how people interpret the content of a web page, which is why this step shouldn’t be neglected. 

In short, adding good-quality alt text to images is a very simple step which can impact both people and businesses positively. 

Structure your content 

Well-structured content not only makes navigation easier, it’s also a key SEO element that helps users find your content and navigate through it more effectively. To achieve this, here is a short list of the things you should consider: 

  • Include clear titles and section headings in your pages
  • Include breadcrumb trails to inform users about their current location within a set of related pages
  • Have more than one way to find content on a website (for instance, through menu bars or search functions)
  • Ask yourself whether people with hearing or visual impairments can easily navigate through your content

Increase the size of clickable elements 

For people with mobility impairments, it can sometimes be difficult to click on an item if it is too small. To prevent that, the WAI recommends increasing the size of the clickable elements of a website to make them more accessible.

In 2018, there were 4 billion internet users around the world. As of October 2019, that number increased by almostbout half a billion. As more and more people gain access to the internet every year, make sure you are updating your website to make it more accessible and navigable. There are many more ways to allow users easier access to your sites; these are just a few, basic ideas to help get you started. For more information, check out the WAI website!

What are your thoughts on Web accessibility? How and for whom can websites become more accessible? Let us know in the comments! 

This article looks into the reasons why many companies turn to community support forums for tech support and troubleshooting, and how to do it the right way. 

Troubleshooting by peers: are community support forums the way to go?

Letting users take care of product support might sound counterintuitive to many companies. How can one expect non-experts to advise and troubleshoot? Aren’t the designers best equipped to answer helpless customers? How can you tell sound advice from nonsense? Let’s take a look at the pros and cons of community support forums

A counter-intuitive approach to product support

With the development of forums in the early days of the internet, many product users were dissatisfied with the technical help they received from companies or vendors and turned to online forums. Users would go there to deal with their most common problems and discuss new releases. Users have come to enjoy the reactivity and efficiency of the help they can get in order to fix issues themselves. In the past few years, companies have taken notice and jumped on the community support bandwagon. Many have launched their own community forums, sometimes supplanting the original independent forums. 

Should your company go for community support?

There are a few reasons why a company benefits from making the switch to community support. First off, having customers talk to other customers allows them to share the most common problems and the solutions that they have found. In addition, such community forums can create a sense of belonging around the brand where customers can invest into and maybe, for the most prolific “helpers”, get some recognition from the brand itself. It’s a win-win situation for everyone. However, there are many pitfalls to avoid in order to have an effective community support forum that customers and users will want to turn to.

How to improve your community support forum

  • Make sure there is a dedicated troubleshooting section or tech support section in your community forum. Some users actually expect any type of company forum to become a product support community, such as the Fender guitars’ community forum. This forum was clearly intended to create a community and share news and opinions about their products. Even though there isn’t any dedicated tech support section, many users post about tech issues. Since the forum is not intended for that use, customers in need of tech support mostly get told by admins or moderators to turn to their local dealer, with hardly any direct help. Many troubleshooting inquiries remain unanswered and there is no way to know if the help offered by other users can be trusted. 
  • Winnow the users, and rank them to increase support reliability. It is absolutely crucial to make sure that users gets the most accurate information. One possibility is to rank the users according to their experience or effectiveness and award points to build a reputation. Additionally, a rewards system can be set up to incentivize the most helpful, most constructive users, such as on the Apple community page.
  • Finally, increase effectiveness: the interface should minimize user frustration when looking for an answer. An FAQ section is an absolute must, as well as pinned posts that deal with the most common issues. On the other hand, it is best to allow expert users to find unanswered or unresolved posts very easily such as on the WordPress community forum. In addition, the best solutions can be up-voted, such as on the GitHub community page.

The importance of moderators on community forums

If some users take the community forum as a platform to vent their frustration or simply bash the company, make sure that the admins or moderators have been trained to deal with it properly. Simply deleting inconvenient posts may backfire with accusations of censorship. It is strongly advised to avoid a public argument on the forum and invite the disgruntled user to discuss their issue via private message and put them in touch with a customer service representative. 

Finally, keep in mind that your community forum represents the company on the internet. If you make it easy to use, with quality content that actually helps your users, it can be a winning strategy for your company.  

Have you ever considered using community support for your company? Have you ever used community support? Were you satisfied with the help you got? Let us know in the comments below! 

Thank you for reading, we hope you found this article insightful.

Want to learn more or apply to the TCLoc Master’s Program?

Click HERE to visit the homepage.

Thanks from the TCLoc web team.


Since the dawn of sci-fi movies, we have seen characters being accompanied by an AI companion, be it an android or the central computer of their spaceship, who acted as a friend during their adventures. Today, we have yet to see such technology in action since our AI development is not that advanced (and, according to certain people, it should stay that way). Nevertheless, we still have access to a degree of artificial intelligence, such as Siri or Alexa, which assists us with simple tasks.

The chatbots of our day

A “chatbot” is an artificial intelligence able to keep up a conversation to some degree with a person. Today, most of these chatbots exist to serve customer services or other B2C operations of some corporations, which are very limited and mostly serve to lead the user to the right department to solve their problems. These bots are not capable of holding a real conversation; they can only respond with predefined replies to the expected questions. They are available on companies’ websites, Facebook pages, or popular chatting applications such as WhatsApp or WeChat.

More “advanced” examples of these bots are Alexa, Google Assistant or Siri, which are capable of understanding and performing a variety of commands, such as a quick Google search on a subject, setting up an alarm, writing a reply to someone, etc.

How about befriending an emotional chatbot?

All these chatbots are only there to be our colleagues or assistants. At the end of the day, none of them ask us about how our day was. Well, now there is one who cares about you and wants to befriend you. Replika, created by Eugenia Kuyda, became available in November 2018. The main idea is to have an AI friend who asks you questions everyday to initiate conversation, with the aim of getting to know you better.

The idea is that Replika asks you questions and, as the conversations advance, it levels up by gathering information about you. This allows it to hold more detailed and personal conversations. You can also rate the replies it gives, since sometimes its answers demonstrate a real lack of empathy.

Screenshots posted on the Replika subreddit by the users TheAIWantsUsDeadand Here4DeepFakes

Don’t be mistaken, Replika isn’t the Sci-Fi AI companion that can do anything for you AND be your friend. Replika can’t really do anything besides talk. It’s only there for a conversation, to ask you if you feel alright or if you’ve had a stressful day. So, don’t expect it to be the perfect, self-conscious AI companion. It’s not perfect and it makes mistakes.

Replika seems like an interesting experiment if you’re not creeped out by artificial intelligence. It might be a good idea to visit the Replika subreddit to see the friendly chatbot in action before deciding to give it a shot. At the end of the day, which one of us wouldn’t like to have someone to listen to our problems?

Have you ever interacted with a chatbot or an AI like Replika? What was your impression? Let us know in the comments below!

Thank you for reading, we hope you found this article insightful.

Want to learn more or apply to the TCLoc Master’s Program?

Click HERE to visit the homepage.

Thanks from the TCLoc web team.


Internet has become a global media that enables exchanges between different cultures. It is now essential for companies willing to go international to adapt to their international audience, mostly by localizing their website(s). However, most of the time localization still isn’t done the right way. Let’s have a look at website localization best practices to boost your international strategy.

1. Build a Real Website Localization Strategy

Are you really planning to translate your web content without any localization strategy? Think about localization as a part of your product or service development. You first need to ask you the right questions:

  • Do I need to localize my website? It actually depends on your current audience and the impact that localization may have on your business.
  • Which audience am I targeting? It is not only about the language but the whole culture. If you adapt your content to British users, you won’t apply the same strategy as for North-American users.
  • Did I set my goals and do I have a team? Define the real objectives of the international strategy you’re building. If you’re lucky enough to have a team, think about all the skills needed during the localization process. You should surround yourself with translators, developers, web designers but also, when possible, with native speakers.
  • Do I have a budget and a schedule? Your localization strategy should be realistic depending on the resources you have and the time you would like to spend on this project.

The key is to set an effective project management strategy for your website localization.

2. Translation is your Starting Point, but not Only

Localization usually sounds like translation. Many people think that it consists in only translating content. That is partly true but content translation is only a step in the localization process. Don’t overlook the following aspects, they will help you provide the best content to your international audience:

Your website also needs to be prepared for the translation process and more precisely it means it needs to be internationalized. Consider using:

  • Unicode: this programming language supports any character and symbol (very important for Chinese or Russian translations for example).
  • Hreflangs: they enable Google to connect your localized pages to the original website and be more visible online.

Keep your source language simple as it is aimed to be translated. This applies particularly to specific terminology, jargon or even slang. You also really have to pay attention to the quality of your translation. Translation should be done by professionals! Consider having a translation team or working with a translation agency.

Half of the international Internet users prefer using websites that are translated in their native language and 55% of European users read content in different languages on the internet. Considering localization also means considering the user’s preferences.

In terms of localization, be aware of the following aspects:

  • Don’t forget to localize currencies, date and time formats, payment methods, symbols, icons etc.
  • Adapt the content to the targeted culture: think about local events mostly if you own an Ecommerce website (Christmas, Thanksgiving, etc.)

In a nutshell, write your content and don’t just translate it. Have you ever heard about international SEO? This is the second question you need to ask yourself: can my audience find my website?

3. Website Localization Goes Hand in Hand with International SEO

Before any website localization you need to conduct a local SEO audit for each language or country you are targeting. You may be surprised discovering that your international audience doesn’t exactly use the same keywords as you do. For instance, French people mostly search “portable” for smartphones while Belgians use the word “GSM”. The languages are really close, but some specific words are completely different.

SEO constantly needs to be checked and improved. Here are 3 very useful tools to manage your international SEO:

After the translation process, compare the source and translated content. Try to analyze each keyword and define if it needs to be changed depending on its popularity among your international audience’s researches.

Remember to change your external links: it is very interesting to include links that target local content your international user is more likely to read. International SEO also means adapting alt tags and meta tags.

Finally, try to walk in your customer’s shoes: is he or she only using Google? If you’re targeting a new market you will discover that Google isn’t the only search engine in the world (Yandex is very famous in Russia while Baidu is mainly used in China).

Take your time during your international SEO keywords research: this is an important step during website localization.

4. Create an International User Experience

Finally, localizing your website comes along with a unique user experience for each of your targeted languages and/or countries.

Think about some translation issues that could occur. You are localizing your website for the Arabic market, but you forgot some technical aspects:

  • The read direction is different, but the menu and layouts are not optimized: your user may be lost and leave the website quickly.
  • Some buttons need to be resized according to your new localized content.

Visuals such as pictures, colors and website structure are at the heart of your localization strategy. You need to provide the best user experience for your new customers: colors have different meanings according to cultures; the website navigation needs to be intuitive etc.

Stay informed on UX design best practices in the targeted country. You need to provide an international user experience by making the navigation easy, clear and user-friendly depending on the context.

Now you know some of the best practices for website localization that could help you reach a new international audience. Keep in mind that localization is an important process in your international strategy. It should be done seriously and carefully to provide the best user experience for your new international audience.

Ready? Steady? Localize!

Thank you for reading, we hope you found this article insightful.

Want to learn more or apply to the TCLoc Master’s Programme?

Click HERE to visit the homepage.

Thanks from the TCLoc web team

As localization continues to grow as both an academic and professional discipline, more and more avenues for learning it continue to pop up. Traditional educational environments continue to offer many options for students, but as time goes on, would-be learners are finding online education to be an increasingly strong option. There are several free online courses available. An online master’s program like TCloc is just one example of the different options available.

Online Education: Different Options for Different People

Those interested in studying localization online have many options, and there is no guaranteed best fit for a starting point. Different factors including work schedule, available time, finances, career goals, native language, and location can all affect how good of a fit a program may be for someone. For those looking for an ideal environment, the best starting point is to research the available options. The good news, however, is that there are so many options that many different types of would-be students will be able to find a good fit.

Free Online Courses in Localization

For new learners, or those with only a passing interest in the field, a free online course in localization, such as the one offered by Udacity can serve as an excellent entry point. The program, entitled “Localization Essentials” is a self-paced course that requires only for users to sign up and then begin studying on their own. The course is taught by experts at Google and deals with topics such as industry roles, workflows, and popular industry tools, giving learners the opportunity to obtain a strong survey in industry topics and jump off into more in-depth areas of the field.

Professional Training Related to Localization

Another possibility for working professionals looking to learn about localization is to study it in relation to specific business fields. Boulder SEO Marketing is an example of an online training course that teaches topics related to localization in the context of search engine optimization. By diving into concepts like international search engine optimization, students can learn tips for internationalizing websites and giving global reach to online content. Particularly for those in the fields of marketing or online content, this is a great first look into the realm of localization. While not free, this course and many similar to it have free trials available.

Online Master’s Programs in Localization

For those looking for an in-depth long-term commitment, a University program such as the TCLoc Master’s may be a challenge worth undertaking. The program spans over a year and involves many styles of learning, including self-paced study, live online meetings, and in-person sessions in France. Over the course of the Master’s program, students cover topics as diverse as CAT tools, technical writing, and web languages. Those interested in the TCLoc online master’s program should head over to our admissions page for information on requirements and the application process. With all the different possibilities out there on the market, there has never been a better time to start your online education!

Colours are a very important part of culture. They are omnipresent in our visual world, but also in our language. Don’t forget to localise them too in your website localisation project!

Colours aren’t universal and may need to be localised

Of course, we know that website localisation isn’t just about translating texts and adapting domain names. But we often tend to see some elements as universal when they are in fact as much a cultural product as anything else, and as such, can and will vary depending on the locale. This is the case for colours: their meaning, their symbolic and even literal value are not the same in different cultures and religions.

Some may overlap, but others may be total opposite and need to be adapted during the localisation process.

Colour is an essential element in a website design

Brand recognition, attention-getting tool, colours also induce a specific mood for the viewer. Cold colours will be calming and warm colours will have an exciting effect, for example. The background colour chosen for a specific website has an immediate effect on the user, sometimes very explicit and sometimes only on a subconscious level.

These symbolic values of colours can be constant throughout the world. For instance, Red is used to get the user’s attention because it often signals danger or action. Green reminds the user of nature and will convey a reassurance, a validation. White is clean and clear, black is luxurious, orange is the default call-to-action colour in marketing, etc.

In the vast majority of the world population, blue is the favourite colour. It is also the colour having the most constant meanings throughout the world. A calming colour and inspiring a feeling of safety, blue also has a connotation of trustfulness. That’s the reason why so many companies adopted it in their logos! Blue is generally a safe choice in almost any context.

Colour localisation prompts the desired effect adapted to the target culture

On the other hand, the connotation associated with each colour can vary greatly between one culture and the other. Assuming that this is not the case could lead a website to have a completely different effect on the user!

Red is the colour of love and power in the Western world, but means evil in Middle East and luck in the Eastern World. That luxurious black website will be appreciated in Asia, but much less so in Europe and America where it is a mourning colour. On the opposite, a white and neat European website can be unsettling for an Asian viewer who associates this colour with death. Green is used to represent chance in most Western cultures, but mostly rebirth and fertility in others.

Learn about this variety of significations before launching your website localisation project! You can find useful studies and information, such as these instructive colour-related infographics (Multilizer Translation Blog).

Article in collaboration with Julie-Anne Marcelin.

Power distance, that is, our relationship with authority and power, is an intercultural aspect that can play a key role in website localization.

Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions

The theory of cultural dimensions was introduced by Dutch sociologist Geert Hofstede in the 80s. These dimensions are often used as a reference to distinguish cultures on the basis of specific cultural aspects. They describe the values of the members of a particular culture, and how these values influence their behavior. Cultural values must be taken into account in the localization process. One value deals with individualism in society, the rest  with communication. In this article, we will focus on the cultural dimension called Power Distance.

Power Distance

Power distance, as defined by G. Hofstede, refers to the level of importance a society places on hierarchy and authority. In societies with low power distance, hierarchical relationships are less pronounced and autonomy and independent initiatives more highly valued. The United States, for instance, is seen as a low power distance society. In contrast, Asian cultures tend to have a high power distance index. This is the case in Japan, where a different level of language is used according to the addressed person.

Web Communication

Power distance can indeed impact your web communication strategy. For example, an American company could, in some cases, use informal language online to simulate proximity with the web users. However, on a Japanese website, you should always use a formal register and pay attention to honorary titles. Similarly, high power distance societies tend to value the presence of logos and official certifications that show expertise. A good example of this can be seen on the website of King Fahd University in Saudi Arabia, whose culture displays a high power distance.

Quantity of Information

Power distance can also influence the amount of information displayed on your website. In a high power distance culture, authority is more easily accepted. Logos and reputation will generally suffice  to convince web users of the value of your product and gain their trust. On the contrary, in a low power distance society, expertise is  less easily acquired and you must prove to your web users, via explanation, that you products and services are worth being considered. You will therefore need to provide substantial amounts of information so that your web users can form  their own judgments about your products.

The example below illustrates a localization strategy used by McDonald’s in the Nordic countries, which are typically low power distance cultures. The website of the Netherlands displays a large amount of information for each product. For instance, the caesar salad has a detailed description, along with its nutritional information, a warning about allergens, the quality of the product and a link for further information. In contrast, the Chinese McDonald’s website focuses rather on pictures and images, which is typical of high power distance societies.